Friday, October 20, 2006

Counterfeit, metaphysical gibberish, professional mystification

Just came across a profile on Kieslowski written by Ewa Nawoj and Jan Strekowski more than 2 years ago for Polish Culture.

Kieslowski is generally revered all over the world as one of the greatest directors. But he remains a controversial figure within his own country. Read, for example, how the authors end the profile:

This penchant for using signs is equally evident in Kieslowski's other films of this period. Kornatowska perceives this last stage of Kieslowski's oeuvre as the director's effort to join in the "fashionable, world, pop-metaphysical current." And she is hardly alone in holding this view.

Kieslowski was a controversial director. This is something that even such a great enthusiast of Krzysztof Kieslowski's cinema as Stanislaw Zawislinski readily admits, writing in the previously cited book:

"What delights some about Kieslowski's current cinema annoys and repulses others. What appears to some to be fresh, innovative, wise, moving, penetrating, to others seems 'counterfeit,' 'metaphysical gibberish,' 'professional mystification.'"